Hello, world.

By Peter A. McKay

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I'm a news technologist based in Northern California. I recently founded Indizr, a site and digital consultancy dedicated to improving news delivery.

This site is my personal home on the web. I also sometimes use it as a space to experiment on new software and content. (For a fuller window into that aspect of pmckay.com, check out the full site code on GitHub.)

I started in journalism in the late '90s as a reporter in the Northern Virginia suburbs for the Washington Post. I then got hired away in 1999 by the Wall Street Journal, where I reported on financial markets for 11 years, writing for both print and digital.

While at the Journal, I was part of the staff that shared the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for breaking coverage of the 9/11 terror attacks next door to our headquarters in Lower Manhattan. I provided daily coverage of the market crash in late 2008 that sparked the Great Recession. In the months following that historic event, I also provided market analysis for more than 100 broadcast outlets around the world on the Journal's behalf.

In 2011, I was part of the Journal team that won a Gerald Loeb Award for breaking coverage of the stock market's "flash crash," caused by a massive computer glitch. I was also a finalist in the same category in 2007 for coverage of the merger of Chicago's two major financial exchanges.

I eventually took a buyout from the Journal to co-found Roscoe Labs, which focused at first on mobile news video and later on encrypted publishing infrastructure. I was (formally) the team's chief product officer and (informally) its chief developer.

The Roscoe team gave it a good go, but we ended up winding down the company in late 2016 as it wasn't working out as a business.

Over time, I've become something of a "journalism polymath," as a good friend recently said to me. That sounds about right. These days, I'm part product manager, part maker, part content creator.

I figure we need news organizations to blend these domains much more seemlessly in order for journalism to survive in the digital era. So I've tried to embody that approach personally as much as possible as well. As the saying goes: Be the change you want to see.